Coral reef monitoring

In season 2016-2017 we conducted a reef survey on the nearby reef. This reef is located between Koh Phra Thong and two smaller islands called Koh Pring Jai and Noi, on the west side of Phra Thong. The location is reachable by swimming and kayaks depending on the tide.

In the survey we recorded fish species, invertebrate species and substrate coverage and compared our result to surveys done previous years (2004, 2006 and 2011). The aim was to see how the reef has recovered from the tsunami in 2004 which caused damage to the reef and island.

The surveys were done by snorkeling on the reef. This was a bit more challenging than expected. Weather conditions were sometimes too rough to be able to kayak to the reef or there was strong current which prevented laying the measuring tape on the bottom. Also the methodology is quite demanding and tiring. There was a lot of diving down to the bottom along the 100 meters of transect.

However, with the help of our volunteers, we were able to survey 5 transects on the reef. The results of the survey show that the hard coral coverage has increased and the amount of fish has increased since the 2006 survey.

The reef is still recovering from the effects of the tsunami but lots of fishes can be spotted on the reef and nice corals are seen in the deeper water. Beautiful nudibranchs can be found at the bottom, colorful butterfly fish are swimming among the corals and schools of snappers are swimming over the reef.

Two times after transect surveying a green turtle was spotted swimming along the reef which was amazing to see! It was a quick glimpse of the turtle but still nice to see them under the water. The reef at Koh Phra Thong is naturally quite rocky but the deeper parts of the reef gives a nice look to the beautiful ecosystem of coral reef and we hope to see it there in the future and hopefully in even better condition.

Susanna

Research Assistant, season 2016-2017

The Yay Day!

The voice of children laughter in Baan Lion woke me up that morning. I opened my eyes and looked around in my new homestay room. It was already bright outside and I smiled. Why? Because that day was the first day I did not have to wake up at 5 a.m to walk 10 km on the beach. It was my third day volunteering with Naucrates in Koh Phra Thong, Thailand.

I got ready lazily and walked to the Naucrates field station at the village. Some other volunteers were already there, and there was Barry – a Canadian researcher who spoke fluent Thai and had been helping Naucrates for the last few years. I had a good feeling that morning and asked with a big smile “Turtle tracks today?” There had not been any turtle tracks for the last few days, so the answer was probably no, but the answer that I got from Barry was surprising, “They found a turtle nest today.” Did he say turtle nest? Turtle nest!! For real? It was the first turtle nest in the season, and also the first one for the staff after walking the beach 10 km every day for the last 50 days!

Last night we had already arranged some activities for volunteers that day, but after the nest finding the schedule changed. Now everyone was too excited to check the nest. According to Mr. Thep, a Thai villager who monitored the beach every morning, the nest was too close to the sea and the eggs might have to be relocated to a safer location. So around 10.45 a.m all 6 volunteers and 2 staff went to the nest site. It was my first time seeing a track and a nest of a wild turtle. Looking at the size and patterns created on the sand, Andrea – Naucrates field leader – concluded it was a green turtle that laid the eggs. We took measurement of the track and based on the shell’s width, it was probably the same turtle who came to the shore and left a track a few days before. If I had seen a turtle nest on a beach before that day, there was no way I would thought it would have been one because it did not look like a nest at all (at least in my opinion).

Mr. Thep was right about the need to relocate the eggs as the nest was only a few meters from the sea during low tide, but according to Andrea it had to be done when the weather was cooler. The temperature that morning was over 30°C and the eggs and embryos should not be exposed to such a high temperature. So we came back to the same nest site at 5 p.m, chose a new site not far from the nest but far enough from the sea so we did not have to worry about high tide. We cleaned the new site for relocation from debris and vegetation, but then when we were ready to dig the nest and take the eggs, it started to rain heavily and we did not want to soak the eggs to the rain water too, so we waited again.

Finally the rain passed and Andrea started digging the nest, looking for the egg chamber. Within 5 minutes he reached the top of the egg chamber and we saw a couple of turtle eggs emerged out from the sand in the hole that Andrea dug.

Now here comes the tricky part: relocating the eggs. Ideally, the eggs have to be relocated to a new “nest” with minimum change during the moving, as minimum as possible. So we tried to create a new “nest” as similar as possible to the original nest. They ought to have the same measurement, dimension, and depth, as well as temperature and humidity. The egg position and their order should not change as well. Andrea took the first egg on top, carefully placed it on the sand without rotating it, then Etienne – Naucrates volunteer coordinator – carefully took the egg and put it in an egg tray that we had prepared, again without rotating it otherwise the egg would not hatch. The first egg tray was filled with turtle eggs within 10 minutes, and within the next 50 minutes, just after a stunning sunset, we’ve got 113 green turtle eggs ready to be relocated.

After taking notes of the dimension of the original nest, Andrea dug a new “nest” following the real nest dimension and together with Etienne they put the turtle eggs, one by one, in reversed order, inside the artificial egg chamber that had just been made. After all the eggs were put inside, we covered the artificial nest with sand, took its exact location with GPS and backed it up with a method called triangulation where the distance of the relocated nest to two nearest trees to form a triangle were measured.

The whole relocation progress took over two hours and we finished after dark, drenched in the rain, with feet full of sandfly bites, but we felt accomplished with the first nest relocation today. Now, we hope to see over 100 hatchlings in the next 50-60 days and more nests from the same turtle in the next two weeks!

By Liz, volunteer with Naucrates (January 16th – 31st 2016)